Tag: peru

My new book – Murder in Lima

Murder in Lima - Cover

Murder in Lima – Cover

My new book has been under way since this summer, and is finally ready to be revealed to the world! 😀

As per usual, janielescueta has done an absolutely gobsmacking job with the cover – he exceeded my expectations and then some. If you’re looking for a cover artist, look no further.

With that out of the way, here is the prologue for the new book. I hope you’ll enjoy it! 😀

A black Mercedes Maybach Pullman pulled up outside 34-35 New Bond Street, London. The creamy white marble facade with two showcase windows on the ground floor housed one of the most fashionable auction houses in London.

From between the second and third floors glistened gold letters which formed the name “Sotheby’s” in the rain. A man wearing black bowler hat and coat stepped out of the driver’s seat. He closed the door behind him and walked with determined steps to the back door which was situated nearly five meters behind the front of the car. As he opened it, he bowed and said, “Welcome, sir!”

– Thanks!

The man answered and went out of the car was light brown skin and had black, curly hair lying in a neat bundle on top of his head. He was wearing a tan leather jacket under if he wore a dark blue polo shirt and an orange t-shirt.

Around the neck, he had a green cotton scarf that stood in stark contrast to glasses with black frames which he wore at the tip of the nose.

He arrived at the stately black doors with gold handles that constituted the entrance to the Sotheby’s auction house. There, a tall man wearing a black coat and top hat greeted him.

– Please hurry, sir, he said in a perfect Cockney accent. “The auction begins in five minutes!”

– Thanks, said the man with the green scarf. I guess I have a reserved seat?

– Of course, answered the tall one and opened one of the black doors. “Welcome!”

The impossible made possible

To ancient man, the oceans were not barriers, but pathways.

– Thor Heyerdahl

69 years ago, an anthropologist – who had been doomed to fail by an entire scientific world – banded together an unlikely crew consisting of a navigator and artist, a fridge selling engineer, a couple of telegraph operators and a Swede, and set sail from the port of Callao heading for Polynesia.

But what they were sailing was not a boat, it was a fleet constructed from balsa wood.

The original Kon Tiki

The original Kon Tiki

Everyone who heard about the adventure thought they sailed to their certain death. But 101 days later, they surfed over the Raroia-reef and showed the world that the impossible was possible.

There aren’t many places abroad that one can get a close encounter with Norwegian history. Norwegians are a rare breed, and we keep mostly to ourselves. Even when we were going to be imperialists, we happened upon some of the most remote pieces of land known to man, land that no one else cared about.

But the port of Callao, half a world away from Norway as the crow flies, is one of the places where Norwegians have not only made their mark. From the port of Callao, we changed world history. Perhaps Polynesia was not populated from the east, but that is only a footnote. Thor Heyerdahl showed the world that pre-Incan civilizations could sail, and that they have had contact with Polynesia has later been proven.

Me, at the port in Callao

Me, at the port in Callao

On the twenty eight of April, 1947, an adventure was started that made Norwegians large not only in their own eyes, but in the world’s. As I sit here watching the sea and thinking about the fact that the palm trees that grow behind me have probably been there since 1947, it strikes me that this place, which in some ways looks like any major port in the world, is a temple to something as un-norwegian as standing out. If the Law of Jante is yin, this place is its yang.

The law of Jante states in part: “You should not think you are better than us.”

A cannon in the port of Callao

A cannon in the port of Callao

Thor Heyerdahl not only thought, but knew he was better than the rest of the scientific world, and he proved it beyond a shadow of a doubt. If you as a Norwegian have been wondering about the reach of the Law of Jante, I now have the definitive answer: it extends to Callao.

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